My Christmas Road Trip

Each year I would usually go to my oldest brother’s house to celebrate Christmas and open gifts with the whole family, but it wasn’t happening this year because of the divorce. Sad face.

I wasn’t near family for the last two years because of Denver, but I’m usually quite content and independent so I’m not irked about it, plus my coworkers and roommates were my substitute family.

This year I woke up inside a tent on Christmas morning to the sound of nature and not a soul around. And at 7000 feet altitude! I found the spot on Google Maps beforehand and read the comments to be sure it would be suitable for my little car to get to. There was a four-mile dirt road I would need to traverse in the dark which would feel like a thousand speed bumps and an eternity, but a commenter said a sedan could do it, so I was assured.

As I made my approach in the dark of night, I was stoked to be doing this kind of adventure again like I had done in 2011 on my mountain bike in Hood River, Oregon. When I stepped out into the crisp mountain air and looked around, I was seized for a moment by a sense of isolation and remoteness, but instead of it being coupled with excitement, I began to feel lonely and maybe even a bit afraid.

That is most certainly not what I was expecting to feel. Those thoughts flooded my mind of me taking a path in life where I become one of those perpetually single guys who gets a camper and just roams from place to place alone.

I’m loving my first-ever solitary camping road trip, but those thoughts that I might become that hermit in the woods with only his thoughts and little projects to keep him company is a frightening notion. I’ll always love being a member of a community and putting myself in the path of others in service, but at 34 years old and having never been in a serious relationship before and not being bothered by that fact? I’m running out of time, and there’s a good chance I could end up being that old man alone in the woods.

I was quite bothered by that thought, indeed. Thank God!

Of Tacoma, Fallout, and Ley Lines

Have you ever heard of “ley lines”?

It’s not very surprising that this phenomena exists, actually, as science has already demonstrated that a field of consciousness exists all around us— as a singularity— well beyond the cranium of humans, and demonstrably proves that the human mind can affect the physical universe, thanks to groundbreaking experiments such as the infamous double-slit experiment and others. (Check out Source Field Investigations by David Wilcock for more about this. DISCLAIMER: I don’t share DW’s philosophical views, but the scientific data points speak for themselves.)

If you’re like me, then you know there is a Great Being that rules over the universe, has His own Will, and creates order and perfection throughout the cosmos that we owe our existence to. Most, including myself, will usually refer to Him by His many names, while others simply choose to use the term “universe” so as to not put up barriers. I use them interchangeably based on my audience, but I usually mean the same thing.

The thing to consider is that every little thing, be it an idea or a physical object, does not exist by chance nor is there really such thing as “coincidence”. In the study of metaphysics, all is connected one way or another, and nothing happens by accident. When observing a phenomenon such as ley lines, one can only marvel at how precise the universe is structured according to what appears to be a higher intelligence that truly is “beyond the veil” of our limited knowledge.  

A note about modern-day ley line observing: Google Maps changes the game with their “measure distance” tool. You see, the lines here aren’t drawn straight— they’re adjusted to compensate for the curvature of the Earth (flat-earthers, you can stop reading now).

With this in mind, go back to that Wikipedia page with the image of the “Sword of St. Michael” and try to recreate it in Google Maps. See what happens?


The Sword of Saint Michael is shaped more like a scimitar.

Keep extending the Sword of St. Michael until it becomes more like a tachi, drop its end where the most stuff lines up, and you get this:


Eat your heart out, David Wilcock!

It passes right through the major cities of the east coast of the US: Boston, New York, and Washington D.C. These are pretty significant cities in “the West” (A side note: as I was researching ley lines on Wikipedia while drafting this post in October, I discovered this incredible ley line).

Keep going further down the line and you’ll end up on the west coast of Mexico.

Since this is technically a video game blog, you should also know that Washington D.C. was the setting of my favorite game Fallout 3, and Boston for my most favorite game Fallout 4

So, where am I going with this? In October I posted about a local artist in Tacoma who seems to have embedded a ley line in her music video. When I extended it further, I found it rather striking:


Ley line from my previous post

Extending this line east from Tacoma already shows some interesting features.

So, how to decide where exactly to drop the point of the line? Since the principle behind this phenomena is interconnectedness, how about a spot with meaningful significance? “Cape Infanta”— like a baby starting life “unable to speak”— the line begins here. And look at how nicely the line hugs the rocky coastline…

Now, since it would be more meaningful to begin at Cape Infanta, let’s return to Tacoma, then extend that line west..


Stop right there! 16,666 kilometers?! That would be an ominous sign, but here in the good ol’ U.S. of A. we use miles. So let’s just move on..
(No offense to any readers who have lived or are currently living on Day Island)

Okay, now we have a line that goes from East to West. If we begin from the East and go West — like the sun travels across the sky— we can end it at Days Island at an interesting distance of 16,666 kilometers!

So, let’s get this straight (or curved): this ley line begins in South Africa, and on Days Island it ends with “666” in the measured distance. What does all this suggest this line should be called?

The “End of Days” Line!!!

Shit just got real. (I really don’t swear that often, but I think is appropriate here)

So, what happens when you combine both the Longsword of Saint Michael and The End of Days Line?


X marks the spot. Click for larger image.

Concord. Red square is site of Old North Bridge. Red circle is Concord Museum.
 
Old North Bridge in Concord. Street view.

Old North Bridge in Sanctuary Hills, Commonwealth (from Fallout 4).
 
Museum of Freedom, Concord, Commonwealth (Fallout 4).

Extra credit: go and see for yourself where Fallout 4 was developed in relation to these ley lines, but before you do that, go ahead and see what else is on these lines in relation to Fallout 4. It should only take a minute, man! 

Well this explains why I’ve been so obsessed with Fallout 4 when it came out.

One day I hope to make a gamer’s pilgrimage of sorts to Boston and Concord. But not before I get a hold of that blue vault 111 jumpsuit!

So, does the post-apocalyptic theme of this game bear any metaphysical relationship to the End of Days and these ley lines? I sure hope not, but if so, maybe this is the universe’s way of telling me that there will be many settlements that will need my help!